Noble Horizons Blog

Lynn Famigletti loves her job.  “I always want to do what I can to help everybody,” says Lynn and as the Wellness Coordinator she is doing exactly that.

On November 12th at 7 pm via Zoom, Noble Horizons hosted Eugenia Zukerman, Hailed by the Boston Globe as “an international triple threat...a published novelist, a television commentator and, most impressively, one of the finest flutists of our time", as she talked about living with Alzheimer’s and her beautiful book “Like Falling Through a Cloud”. Eugenia was accompanied by Elizabeth Smith-Boivin, Executive Director of Alzheimer's Association Northeastern New York.

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and it’s also the kickoff to the holiday season. The most important focus of the holidays is spending time enjoying the company of friends and family, although the food is a very close second. Whether you or an aging loved one has diabetes, it can be especially difficult to manage the disease during this time of year. It requires self-control and some careful planning.

When Medicare awarded Noble Horizons its highest 5-star rating, we were especially proud to be recognized for our staffing levels which exceed the industry standard.  Providing extra hands to deliver exceptional care is The Noble Way.  Royalty is a nurse who discovered Noble in this way and the match between Noble and Royalty so well that she has worked exclusively at Noble Horizons since November of 2019.

Social interaction is a key component to healthy aging. Beyond a cup of coffee, there are many ways for older adults to remain socially connected, among them volunteering, adult education, new hobbies and volunteering which is an excellent way to stay connected to one’s community and to give back.

We all age differently and thereby will face different challenges over the years. Navigating health care decisions later on in life isn’t always a straightforward progression either. Making the decision to move from an independent living environment to one that involves 24-hour care is one that should be carefully thought through and discussed with loved ones.

Whether you are new to Medicare or have been enrolled for several years, it’s important to understand that Medicare plans change from year to year.  The best time to join a Medicare health or drug plan is when you first get Medicare. Signing up when you’re first eligible can help you avoid paying a lifetime Part D late enrollment penalty. If you miss your first chance, you can sign up during Medicare’s annual Open Enrollment Period (October 15–December 7).

Drawing attention to stroke awareness and art therapy is very important in our community. Because of a stroke’s significant impact on the physical body, victims may struggle to adjust emotionally. Stress, frustration, and helplessness are all feelings that can negatively affect a stroke victim’s self-esteem and quality of life.  

As we get older, this common back problem can get worse. Here's how to recognize the symptoms.

Although there is no magic pill for preventing falls in the elderly, we often overlook one of the best kept secrets in prevention.  Physical Therapists can help reduce the risk of elderly falls by 25 percent or more. Falls are the leading cause of fatal injuries in older adults and are the most common cause of nonfatal, trauma related hospitals admissions.

Transitioning your parents from their home to a retirement community needn’t be stressful – in fact, it can be quite enjoyable!  The key is making the move a family endeavor plus ensuring your parents are 100% involved in the decision-making process – after all this will be their home for hopefully years to come.

If you’ve ever donated to a non-profit before, you’ve realized that every donation matters - big or small. However, there are more ways to make a difference than just a one-time, monthly, or even yearly donation to your favorite organization.   Planned Giving, also known as legacy giving, deferred giving, or estate giving is a powerful way to pass on a legacy to an organization you are passionate about supporting.  

Marion Romeo’s 9/24 Lakeville Journal picture with her husband Fred doesn't just celebrate 60 years of marriage, it recognizes the loyalty that defines Marion's commitment to others. Her astonishing 20-years as a beloved Noble Horizons volunteer further evidences her dedication and steadfastness.  After retiring from a nursing career in 1998, Marion brought her skills, compassion, and kind heart to Noble where two decades later she continues to touch lives.

During a recent staff meeting, the leadership team decided to share stories about our co-workers and life during the past 6 months here at Noble.  I immediately thought of our nursing staff.

Carita Gardiner

Carita Gardiner is a veteran English instructor at The Hotchkiss School. She’s taught countless students and scores of literary works, and her entire career has been focused on creating and sustaining a love affair with literature and writing for herself and her students.

Ellie Youngblood, the young manager of Fairfield Farm at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut, represents a generational link between farming’s agrarian past, and its socially conscientious future. Ellie is a self-described “turbo farm nerd” who began working on Marble Valley Farm in her hometown of Kent, CT, at the age of 16, and has been farming ever since.

Caroline Moller has been donating her time and infectious cheer to Noble Horizons for nearly two decades and her contributions have added up! Whether reading to residents, taking them to events on campus, or working in the library, she explains, "I love to help."  

When Jessica Boardman is asked why she became a nurse, her answer is swift and clear, “I like to help people.” Acting on this instinct, Jessica joined the Dover Plains ambulance service as a young EMT volunteer and quickly discovered that she not only enjoyed offering help as a first responder but that she had a facility for the highly technical training it requires. Volunteering as an EMT in her home town of Dover, NY reinforced her love for helping people and led to her decision to enter the medical field. Despite a full-time job, she enrolled in nursing school and juggled both her career and education. “It took me four years to complete my associate’s degree, but I did it.”

For Leslie Eckstein, mother of four and owner of Studio Lakeville in Lakeville, Connecticut, the sudden challenge of owning a health and fitness business during a pandemic, and the isolation of the elderly population gave way for an opportunity to provide support on two critically important fronts.

Pain had become a part of daily life for the Tri-Corner area’s voice Marshall Miles. “I have had what doctors call over-pronated ankles since I was a child,” he says. “So I have dealt with pain in that area of my body for most of my life.” Over-pronation is commonly defined as a prolonged flattening of the arches in the foot and an inward tilting of the ankles. Over time, it is this stress in a foot with little to no arch support that causes pain in the knees, ankles, feet and even back.