Noble Horizons Blog

There is a tendency to judge groups of people as homogeneous rather a collection of individuals.   Seniors, for example, consist of different demographics, pursue different goals, harbor different needs or concerns, and enjoy different hobbies and interests. These generalizations can extend to senior living communities that are as diverse as the people who call them home.

Have you ever bought something new, put it away for future use, and then months or even years later find it stuffed in a corner or back of a drawer – sometimes with the store tag or label still on it? You aren’t alone. We all accumulate stuff over the years – and yes, stuff we don’t even remember we have. Some items become heirlooms or even hold sentimental value that can’t be purchased like artwork created by children or grandchildren.

Starting a new exercise regimen can be tough at any age, but for an older adult it can be especially intimidating. For those who are out of shape or dealing with health conditions it can be downright scary. That’s where yoga comes in.

In Greek, “Holos” means wholeness. From the Greek root, holism is thus to do with the whole unit rather than as a sum of its individual parts. It follows naturally, then, that holistic care is about caring for the whole human being.

To say Noble Horizons is in Auxiliary President Judy McKernon’s blood would be stating the obvious. Judy’s family connection to Noble dates back to its inception.  Judy’s father Tom Wagner, a local attorney, was chosen to administer the John H and Ethel G Noble Charitable Trust, the purpose of which was to provide a place for older people to live out their lives in pleasant, homelike surroundings.  Noble Horizons was created to fulfill this purpose, and Tom, with his wife Fran, played central roles in its development.

Most people equate December with the holidays – and rightfully so – but December is also a great month to spend some time on hobbies like reading and writing. In fact, the whole month of December is known as Read a New Book Month, and December 7th is National Letter Writing Day!

On December 4thwe wished long time Recreation Department member, JoAnna Whitmore, a happy retirement.  JoAnna joined the Noble community nine years ago, following a long career at Sharon Hospital. “It was one of the best decisions I ever made. As soon as I got here, I felt so at home. Everyone here is so caring and dedicated." Looking back, she adds, "I feel like I should always have been here.  I am leaving with lots of love.”

Lynn Famigletti loves her job.  “I always want to do what I can to help everybody,” says Lynn and as the Wellness Coordinator she is doing exactly that.

On November 12th at 7 pm via Zoom, Noble Horizons hosted Eugenia Zukerman, Hailed by the Boston Globe as “an international triple threat...a published novelist, a television commentator and, most impressively, one of the finest flutists of our time", as she talked about living with Alzheimer’s and her beautiful book “Like Falling Through a Cloud”. Eugenia was accompanied by Elizabeth Smith-Boivin, Executive Director of Alzheimer's Association Northeastern New York.

November is Diabetes Awareness Month and it’s also the kickoff to the holiday season. The most important focus of the holidays is spending time enjoying the company of friends and family, although the food is a very close second. Whether you or an aging loved one has diabetes, it can be especially difficult to manage the disease during this time of year. It requires self-control and some careful planning.

When Medicare awarded Noble Horizons its highest 5-star rating, we were especially proud to be recognized for our staffing levels which exceed the industry standard.  Providing extra hands to deliver exceptional care is The Noble Way.  Royalty is a nurse who discovered Noble in this way and the match between Noble and Royalty so well that she has worked exclusively at Noble Horizons since November of 2019.

Social interaction is a key component to healthy aging. Beyond a cup of coffee, there are many ways for older adults to remain socially connected, among them volunteering, adult education, new hobbies and volunteering which is an excellent way to stay connected to one’s community and to give back.

We all age differently and thereby will face different challenges over the years. Navigating health care decisions later on in life isn’t always a straightforward progression either. Making the decision to move from an independent living environment to one that involves 24-hour care is one that should be carefully thought through and discussed with loved ones.

Whether you are new to Medicare or have been enrolled for several years, it’s important to understand that Medicare plans change from year to year.  The best time to join a Medicare health or drug plan is when you first get Medicare. Signing up when you’re first eligible can help you avoid paying a lifetime Part D late enrollment penalty. If you miss your first chance, you can sign up during Medicare’s annual Open Enrollment Period (October 15–December 7).

Drawing attention to stroke awareness and art therapy is very important in our community. Because of a stroke’s significant impact on the physical body, victims may struggle to adjust emotionally. Stress, frustration, and helplessness are all feelings that can negatively affect a stroke victim’s self-esteem and quality of life.  

As we get older, this common back problem can get worse. Here's how to recognize the symptoms.

Although there is no magic pill for preventing falls in the elderly, we often overlook one of the best kept secrets in prevention.  Physical Therapists can help reduce the risk of elderly falls by 25 percent or more. Falls are the leading cause of fatal injuries in older adults and are the most common cause of nonfatal, trauma related hospitals admissions.

Transitioning your parents from their home to a retirement community needn’t be stressful – in fact, it can be quite enjoyable!  The key is making the move a family endeavor plus ensuring your parents are 100% involved in the decision-making process – after all this will be their home for hopefully years to come.

If you’ve ever donated to a non-profit before, you’ve realized that every donation matters - big or small. However, there are more ways to make a difference than just a one-time, monthly, or even yearly donation to your favorite organization.   Planned Giving, also known as legacy giving, deferred giving, or estate giving is a powerful way to pass on a legacy to an organization you are passionate about supporting.