The Secrets of Healthy Eating As You Age

sue_mastrangelo

“Eat a rainbow of foods,” advised Sue Mastrangelo, speaking at Noble on July 26. A registered dietician board certified in gerontological nutrition, Mastrangelo consults with Noble’s dining staff on a regular basis but seldom has the opportunity to talk directly with the public about all she knows about good nutrition as we age.

It’s not so different from good nutrition at any age. Eat a wide variety of foods, particularly fruits and vegetables. The perfect dinner plate should consist of one quarter protein, one quarter grains, and one half fruits and vegetables, plus dairy, she said.   We should eat unprocessed, nutrient-dense food, but not rely solely on “super foods,” a list which changes regularly but has recently included blueberries, salmon, almonds, avocados, kale and other dark leafy greens, all fine foods, but only when part of a varied diet.

One thing to keep in mind as we age it that our sense of thirst declines, so it is important make drinking adequate fluids a habit, whether we feel thirsty or not. Eight 8-ounce glasses per day is still the rule, but that fluid intake can include tea, coffee, juice, broth and other liquids as well as water.

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