Ladies, Save Your Rags!

With these stirring words, Zenas Crane announced that his paper mill was open for business in 1801. And well over 200 years later, Crane is still making paper on its original site in Dalton, Massachusetts.

On Saturday, October 27, Douglas Crane, a 4th generation descendant of Zenas, shared the history of his family’s enterprise with a receptive audience at Noble Horizons. Crane has long been known for its fine writing paper. But what makes the company unique is that it has been the sole supplier of currency paper for the US Treasury since 1879.   

Durability is an important factor in currency paper and to meet that requirement, Crane uses a combination of cotton (see the above plea for rags) and linen. It’s not just any rag/linen paper, however. In recent years, ever more ingenious security features to foil counterfeiters have been incorporated into the paper making process, helping to ensure that that $20 bill in your wallet is legit.

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It was a standing room only crowd who gathered in Noble’s Life Long Learning Center on November 3 for an information-packed lecture on the aftermath of World War I presented by Hamish Lutris, associate professor of history at Capital Community College in Hartford.

 

With these stirring words, Zenas Crane announced that his paper mill was open for business in 1801. And well over 200 years later, Crane is still making paper on its original site in Dalton, Massachusetts.

Bringing comfort, care and healing to every member of the Noble Horizons community is what we do every single day. To underscore this commitment, Noble Horizons has introduced Concierge Care which will ensure that a guest’s care and experience exceed their expectations.

It’s all water down the drain, right? It is, indeed, water going down, but with a stew of pharmaceuticals and other substances. Just because we can’t see it any longer doesn’t mean it isn’t making its way into ground and surface water, negatively impacting water quality and aquatic life and fueling the rise in antibiotic-resistant superbugs. Who knew? And all you did was pull the plug.