Ladies, Save Your Rags!

With these stirring words, Zenas Crane announced that his paper mill was open for business in 1801. And well over 200 years later, Crane is still making paper on its original site in Dalton, Massachusetts.

On Saturday, October 27, Douglas Crane, a 4th generation descendant of Zenas, shared the history of his family’s enterprise with a receptive audience at Noble Horizons. Crane has long been known for its fine writing paper. But what makes the company unique is that it has been the sole supplier of currency paper for the US Treasury since 1879.   

Durability is an important factor in currency paper and to meet that requirement, Crane uses a combination of cotton (see the above plea for rags) and linen. It’s not just any rag/linen paper, however. In recent years, ever more ingenious security features to foil counterfeiters have been incorporated into the paper making process, helping to ensure that that $20 bill in your wallet is legit.

Go back

Recent Blog Posts View All

Carita Gardiner is a veteran English instructor at The Hotchkiss School. She’s taught countless students and scores of literary works, and her entire career has been focused on creating and sustaining a love affair with literature and writing for herself and her students.

Ellie Youngblood, the young manager of Fairfield Farm at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Connecticut, represents a generational link between farming’s agrarian past, and its socially conscientious future. Ellie is a self-described “turbo farm nerd” who began working on Marble Valley Farm in her hometown of Kent, CT, at the age of 16, and has been farming ever since.

Caroline Moller has been donating her time and infectious cheer to Noble Horizons for nearly two decades and her contributions have added up! Whether reading to residents, taking them to events on campus, or working in the library, she explains, "I love to help."  

When Jessica Boardman is asked why she became a nurse, her answer is swift and clear, “I like to help people.” Acting on this instinct, Jessica joined the Dover Plains ambulance service as a young EMT volunteer and quickly discovered that she not only enjoyed offering help as a first responder but that she had a facility for the highly technical training it requires. Volunteering as an EMT in her home town of Dover, NY reinforced her love for helping people and led to her decision to enter the medical field. Despite a full-time job, she enrolled in nursing school and juggled both her career and education. “It took me four years to complete my associate’s degree, but I did it.”