Kim Maxwell, Ph.D Presentation

James Madison

Noble Horizons is honored to share a recent presentation by former Stanford University professor, Kim Maxwell, Ph.D., inventor of the modern dial-up modem and founder of the company that was awarded the worldwide standard for DSL. On August 4, Maxwell explained how rural areas like the northwest corner of Connecticut can secure a vibrant future by bringing fast, universal connectivity. Invoking the words of James Madison, "In a free society the people must have a say in the laws that govern them," Maxwell linked the erosion of people’s role in government to the lack of universal internet connectivity as the internet is the primary means of communication in the 21st century.

Maxwell's presentation begins with a description of the current political condition and how it relates to similar periods of American history. He then relates the current political chaos to the nation's dysfunctional telecommunications infrastructure, its effect on northwest Connecticut, and what can and should be done about it. He reveals the damage done by the 1996 Telecommunications Act and the recent incapacities of CT's state government to make necessary changes to move rural areas into the communications future. Maxwell believes strongly that local municipalities must make the changes themselves to regain political stability. In closing, he again references James Madison's exhortation that in a free society the people must have a say in the laws that govern them. Maxwell concludes that in today's world, communities must provide universal connectivity to ensure that people can have a say in the laws that govern them.

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