Exploring the Statues of Central Park

moby_mudge

G.A. Mudge took on quite a project that has taken some years to complete: cataloguing and photographing the dozens of statues, dating from 1859 to the 1990s, scattered about Central Park.

He came to Noble on November 11 to share some of the fruits of his labor in an illustrated talk. Among the adornments of the park he included in his talk were fanciful animals at the zoo, Romeo and Juliet, Alice In Wonderland, Mother Goose, a stirring memorial to the fallen Union soldiers of New York’s 7th Regiment, and tributes to musicians ranging from Beethoven to Duke Ellington to John Lennon.

Mudge, a Wassaic resident, has compiled his work in two books. For more information, go to his website www.fotobs.com.

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