Create Your Own Legacy

Probate Judge Diane Blick spoke to an audience at Noble Horizons for one reason only: to dispel worries about the probate process.

In her third term as probate judge for Litchfield County, Judge Blick, known affectionately as the "judge on wheels" due to her habit of traveling to the homes of residents who need her help, said that planning was the most important advice she could give.

Compile and store in a safe but accessible place detailed information about all the assets you have, hire an experienced attorney to draw up a comprehensive will and healthcare directive and then relax. You will have done everything you can to avoid Connecticut laws of intestacies that could take control of your estate out of your hands.

Following questions from the audience, Judge Blick spoke at length about powers of attorney, conservatorships of persons and conservatorships of estates, trusts, the limits of tax-free estates in Connecticut, and the time it takes to complete the probate process.

After Judge Blick's presentation, Amanda Halle of the Western Connecticut Area Agency on Aging offered practical advice about avoiding Medicare fraud. Rising to the top are two key take-aways: never share your Medicare information with anyone but a trusted friend or family member and your doctor; be aware that Medicare officials never, ever make unsolicited phone calls. Stay wise to such calls and report them to authorities.

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