Caroline Moller: Volunteering Adds Up

Caroline Moller has been donating her time and infectious cheer to Noble Horizons for nearly two decades and her contributions have added up! Whether reading to residents, taking them to events on campus, or working in the library, she explains, "I love to help."  

Over 10 years ago, Caroline took on a new volunteer role and the impact of her contributions are immeasurable. Every other week Caroline stops by Noble to pick up and diligently count the dollar totals on the thousands of LaBonne’s Market receipts submitted by Noble friends, residents and staff. LaBonne’s hosts the Cash for Charities program, through which local non-profits receive a portion of the proceeds from each receipt they submit. Noble has long participated in the program and has always directed the funds to the Employee Scholarship Fund.

For Caroline, it’s a chance to help others and to apply her patient and detail-oriented work style. When Caroline was asked how much her work has yielded, she had no idea. A quick review of the monthly tallies reveals that Caroline's efforts earn about $600 annually or over the last decade, a remarkable $6000! Thanks to Caroline, scores of Noble employees have become certified CNAs, earned nursing degrees, or pursued advanced specialties within the field of nursing. Countless lives have been transformed with grants from the Employee Scholarship Fund; as one grateful employee exclaimed, "Caroline is a volunteer hero!”

Caroline thought her work would slow down during COVID. After a lull, receipt donations have picked up--a lot. Currently, she has a “sizable box” that she’s culling through, adding subtotals, and creating bundles of receipts totaling $1,000. “Everybody must have been stockpiling. I have receipts going back to 2019 that I’m working through. During COVID they must be cleaning out rooms and desks,” she chuckles.   

Caroline’s humility and joyous approach to life make helping others an important part of her day. “I lost both of my parents when I was very young. At 16 I was moving ahead on my own. You learn how to wing it,” she continues, “Because that happened to me it’s given me strength. I don’t have fear of what comes my way. I feel strong. I want to keep moving and giving!”

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